Camping vs Glamping – What’s right for you?

Everyone knows what camping looks like, right? It’s a rustic pastime involving tents, campfires, badly cooked food and, usually, an absence of showers.

As is the case with so many things, this impression of camping is neither entirely true, nor completely false.

It is the reason why a lot of people would rather walk barefoot in a broken-glass desert than consider a camping holiday.

But what if they could go glamping, instead?

What’s the difference between camping and glamping? Glad you asked.

 

More than just names?

 

You’d think that changing a couple consonants at the start of a word can’t do much, and broadly that’s true. The ‘g’ and ‘l’ in glamping are derived from glamourous – so, glamourous camping.

Add glamour to camping and you make a new word, but not one that necessarily describes a new activity. Centuries ago European royals and Ottoman grandees were bedding down outside their palaces in, well, palatial style. And a fancy-camping African safari was quite the done thing in the 1920s for well-to-do Brits and Americans.

The word ‘glamping’ first appeared in media travel stories in the early 2000s. The Oxford English Dictionary included it from 2016. The debate among outdoorsy types as to whether it’s a good thing or not will continue forever, and is really by the by.

Like camping, glamping’s here to stay.

 

It’s all about nature

Let’s take a look – somewhat counter-intuitively – at what camping and glamping have in common.

As this fast-paced, crazy world gets ever faster and crazier, it’s widely acknowledged that we humans – especially those of us in developed Western nations – are losing our connection to the natural world.

What we’re gaining is anything but good: depression, anxiety, substance addictions, loneliness, destructive consumption and spinal problems from too much sitting around indoors, to name but a few.

Nature is the ultimate restorative, and conveniently it’s just outside.

 

“Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life,” wrote Rachel Carson, marine biologist and acclaimed author of Silent Spring.

“I felt my lungs inflate with the onrush of scenery – air, mountains, trees, people,” wrote poet Sylvia Plath. “I thought, this is what it is to be happy.”

Forget spa treatments and vitamin supplements. You just have to work out a way to get into the wild.

 

 

 

A certain quality

 

And thus you say: that’s all very well, but there’s no way I’m ever going to buy a tent, a rucksack and a camping stove. Even if I did I wouldn’t know how to use them, and by the way, do tents have USB outlets?

Okay. At a first reading it seems that you’re more likely to get into nature if you consider glamping. That’s cool – there’s no absolute right and wrong here.

Most dictionaries define glamour as an exciting or attractive quality, one that makes things – people, places or activities – seem more appealing.

All you have to do is determine what appeals to you.

 

For and against

 

For the sake of this exercise, let’s assume that your nature-based experience is going to include walking. (Strictly, this would make our comparison hiking vs gliking, but we’re sure you’ll allow us some latitude).

 

Camping

  • Cohort: can be done alone or with friends
  • Support: little or none; expect to be fully independent. You choose where to go, what you’ll do and how long you’ll stay
  • Preparation: will require you to do your own planning, booking, shopping and packing
  • Load: medium to high range (minimum typically 12–14kg; can be a lot more for a long walk). Will include a sleeping bag, tent, camping mattress, stove, fuel, all food, and all personal gear
  • Sleeping quarters: tent. Additional shelter: natural features such as vegetation and rock formations, or a lightweight tarp if you choose to carry it
  • Food: cooked yourself, fresh or preserved, depending on how much you wish to carry; alcoholic beverages served only if you carry them yourself
  • Bathing: creeks, rivers, waterfalls and oceans
  • Toilets: possibly at some camp sites, otherwise you’re, er, observing wild toileting protocols
  • Heating: none, or possibly a fire, if you’re in an area and walking at a time when fires are permitted
  • Price: low to medium range, depending on factors including travel distance from home and transport and any additional accommodation required
  • Additional notes: if you learn to navigate, you’ll have the opportunity to visit and experience trackless wilderness

Our glamping experience

  • Cohort: small group (maximum 10)
  • Support: high. Departures run on a fixed itinerary and all are led by two guides
  • Preparation: choose a departure date and make a booking; a gear list will be supplied and on departure day your guides will offer packing advice and assistance
  • Load: low range (6–8kg) unless you take heavier additional personal items, such as camera equipment. Includes lunch and personal gear. Portered – pack-free – walks for an additional fee available on some departures
  • Sleeping quarters: huts with beds at bush camps on nights one and two; fully appointed rooms in historic Bernacchi House on night three. Additional shelter at camps: communal dining tent
  • Food: Specially curated menu using gourmet Tasmanian produce cooked by guides. All fresh ingredients carried by guides. Wine served with meals included in trip fee
  • Bathing: outdoor showers and a ‘bathing cabin’ at bush camps; guides heat water for a quick clean/rinse. Modern bathrooms with hot water at Bernacchi House
  • Heating: gas heaters in the dining tents at bush camps; two wood-burning stoves at Bernacchi House
  • Price: medium to high range, in addition to factors including travel distance from home and any additional accommodation required
  • Additional notes: Complimentary pick-up at Hobart accommodation and drop-off either at Hobart airport or accommodation. Trip fee includes all road and maritime transport to and from the walk

For more information about The Maria Island Walk please visit https://www.mariaislandwalk.com.au/the-walk/the-accommodation/

 

What do the experts say?

 

Ian Johnstone is something of a paradox: he’s a lifetime independent camper/hiker who decided to start a glamping trip: The Maria Island Walk.

“I kept meeting people who said they’d love to go camping or hiking but didn’t know how to, and I also thought that Maria Island was one of the most beautiful and remarkable places I’d ever seen,” Ian says. “I knew that people would feel fabulous and rejuvenated if they had a holiday in such a place.”

It took a lot of work with Parks and Wildlife Tasmania to get all environmental safeguards and permissions in place, but the result was exactly what Ian had hoped: an achievable adventure and reconnection with nature for people who’d otherwise miss out.

“I’m not sure the word ‘glamping’ is my favourite, but it’s true that The Maria Island Walk is much more comfortable than camping,” Ian says. “I just love hearing from our guests about how much they enjoyed the island, and the walk, and how fab their guides were. That’s what we’re all about.”