Camping vs Glamping – What’s right for you?

Everyone knows what camping looks like, right? It’s a rustic pastime involving tents, campfires, badly cooked food and, usually, an absence of showers.

As is the case with so many things, this impression of camping is neither entirely true, nor completely false.

It is the reason why a lot of people would rather walk barefoot in a broken-glass desert than consider a camping holiday.

But what if they could go glamping, instead?

What’s the difference between camping and glamping? Glad you asked.

 

More than just names?

 

You’d think that changing a couple consonants at the start of a word can’t do much, and broadly that’s true. The ‘g’ and ‘l’ in glamping are derived from glamourous – so, glamourous camping.

Add glamour to camping and you make a new word, but not one that necessarily describes a new activity. Centuries ago European royals and Ottoman grandees were bedding down outside their palaces in, well, palatial style. And a fancy-camping African safari was quite the done thing in the 1920s for well-to-do Brits and Americans.

The word ‘glamping’ first appeared in media travel stories in the early 2000s. The Oxford English Dictionary included it from 2016. The debate among outdoorsy types as to whether it’s a good thing or not will continue forever, and is really by the by.

Like camping, glamping’s here to stay.

 

It’s all about nature

Let’s take a look – somewhat counter-intuitively – at what camping and glamping have in common.

As this fast-paced, crazy world gets ever faster and crazier, it’s widely acknowledged that we humans – especially those of us in developed Western nations – are losing our connection to the natural world.

What we’re gaining is anything but good: depression, anxiety, substance addictions, loneliness, destructive consumption and spinal problems from too much sitting around indoors, to name but a few.

Nature is the ultimate restorative, and conveniently it’s just outside.

 

“Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life,” wrote Rachel Carson, marine biologist and acclaimed author of Silent Spring.

“I felt my lungs inflate with the onrush of scenery – air, mountains, trees, people,” wrote poet Sylvia Plath. “I thought, this is what it is to be happy.”

Forget spa treatments and vitamin supplements. You just have to work out a way to get into the wild.

 

 

 

A certain quality

 

And thus you say: that’s all very well, but there’s no way I’m ever going to buy a tent, a rucksack and a camping stove. Even if I did I wouldn’t know how to use them, and by the way, do tents have USB outlets?

Okay. At a first reading it seems that you’re more likely to get into nature if you consider glamping. That’s cool – there’s no absolute right and wrong here.

Most dictionaries define glamour as an exciting or attractive quality, one that makes things – people, places or activities – seem more appealing.

All you have to do is determine what appeals to you.

 

For and against

 

For the sake of this exercise, let’s assume that your nature-based experience is going to include walking. (Strictly, this would make our comparison hiking vs gliking, but we’re sure you’ll allow us some latitude).

 

Camping

  • Cohort: can be done alone or with friends
  • Support: little or none; expect to be fully independent. You choose where to go, what you’ll do and how long you’ll stay
  • Preparation: will require you to do your own planning, booking, shopping and packing
  • Load: medium to high range (minimum typically 12–14kg; can be a lot more for a long walk). Will include a sleeping bag, tent, camping mattress, stove, fuel, all food, and all personal gear
  • Sleeping quarters: tent. Additional shelter: natural features such as vegetation and rock formations, or a lightweight tarp if you choose to carry it
  • Food: cooked yourself, fresh or preserved, depending on how much you wish to carry; alcoholic beverages served only if you carry them yourself
  • Bathing: creeks, rivers, waterfalls and oceans
  • Toilets: possibly at some camp sites, otherwise you’re, er, observing wild toileting protocols
  • Heating: none, or possibly a fire, if you’re in an area and walking at a time when fires are permitted
  • Price: low to medium range, depending on factors including travel distance from home and transport and any additional accommodation required
  • Additional notes: if you learn to navigate, you’ll have the opportunity to visit and experience trackless wilderness

Our glamping experience

  • Cohort: small group (maximum 10)
  • Support: high. Departures run on a fixed itinerary and all are led by two guides
  • Preparation: choose a departure date and make a booking; a gear list will be supplied and on departure day your guides will offer packing advice and assistance
  • Load: low range (6–8kg) unless you take heavier additional personal items, such as camera equipment. Includes lunch and personal gear. Portered – pack-free – walks for an additional fee available on some departures
  • Sleeping quarters: huts with beds at bush camps on nights one and two; fully appointed rooms in historic Bernacchi House on night three. Additional shelter at camps: communal dining tent
  • Food: Specially curated menu using gourmet Tasmanian produce cooked by guides. All fresh ingredients carried by guides. Wine served with meals included in trip fee
  • Bathing: outdoor showers and a ‘bathing cabin’ at bush camps; guides heat water for a quick clean/rinse. Modern bathrooms with hot water at Bernacchi House
  • Heating: gas heaters in the dining tents at bush camps; two wood-burning stoves at Bernacchi House
  • Price: medium to high range, in addition to factors including travel distance from home and any additional accommodation required
  • Additional notes: Complimentary pick-up at Hobart accommodation and drop-off either at Hobart airport or accommodation. Trip fee includes all road and maritime transport to and from the walk

For more information about The Maria Island Walk please visit https://www.mariaislandwalk.com.au/the-walk/the-accommodation/

 

What do the experts say?

 

Ian Johnstone is something of a paradox: he’s a lifetime independent camper/hiker who decided to start a glamping trip: The Maria Island Walk.

“I kept meeting people who said they’d love to go camping or hiking but didn’t know how to, and I also thought that Maria Island was one of the most beautiful and remarkable places I’d ever seen,” Ian says. “I knew that people would feel fabulous and rejuvenated if they had a holiday in such a place.”

It took a lot of work with Parks and Wildlife Tasmania to get all environmental safeguards and permissions in place, but the result was exactly what Ian had hoped: an achievable adventure and reconnection with nature for people who’d otherwise miss out.

“I’m not sure the word ‘glamping’ is my favourite, but it’s true that The Maria Island Walk is much more comfortable than camping,” Ian says. “I just love hearing from our guests about how much they enjoyed the island, and the walk, and how fab their guides were. That’s what we’re all about.”

 

The Maria Island Walk: CERTIFIED EXCELLENT

Tasmanian guided walk earns international award for its consistently outstanding service.

Hobart-based business The Maria Island Walk is no stranger to tourism gongs, having won eight national and a dozen Tasmanian awards over its 17-year history. But its latest plaudit – a 2019 TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence – is especially satisfying to The Maria Island Walk’s owners and staff because it recognises their dedication to customer service.

Awarded annually since 2011 by TripAdvisor, the world’s largest travel platform, Certificate of Excellence winners include restaurants, accommodation and attractions from every part of the world. Recipients are announced once a year, in late May.

TripAdvisor’s Vice President of Brand, Neela Pal, said the Certificates “publicly recognise businesses that are actively taking into account customer feedback to help travellers confidently experience the most highly reviewed places to eat, stay and explore.”

To qualify for a Certificate of Excellence a business must have been listed on TripAdvisor for at least twelve months, it must have received a minimum number of reviews and it must maintain an overall TripAdvisor bubble rating of at least four out of five. The only way to qualify is to have customers who care enough about their experience of a business that they take the time to write an independent review on TripAdvisor.

More than 97 per cent of The Maria Island Walk’s TripAdvisor reviewers rate their experience as excellent. A recent example of this customer satisfaction comes from Andrew, of Melbourne, who wrote a review titled “Rare perfection”. “[The Maria Island Walk] has clearly put lots of thought and work into getting every aspect just right. And those aspects can be adjusted to the individual needs of each walker… Our guides, Luke and Tim, were exceptional. Clearly hugely experienced as guides, knowledgeable, patient but also excellent cooks and hosts.”

Amira El Kheir, the Maria Island Walk’s Marketing Executive, said the TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence was “great news”, and that the business wouldn’t be resting on its laurels. “Everyone here is committed to making sure that every guest has an experience at the highest possible level. So, while we’re thrilled that so many guests over the past year reviewed us so well, our focus is on next year’s guests – we want them to enjoy the experience every bit as much!”

 

Family Friendly Maria Island Walk

An outdoor family adventure walking the length of beautiful Maria Island National Park is a great experience to share quality time as a family.

Re-connecting with nature, spotting a variety of incredible wildlife, swimming in pristine beaches and hiking to the top of magnificent mountains will create memories to last a lifetime.

In January 2019 we had three wonderful families join us on a ‘Family Friendly Portered Walk’.

“The guides were fabulous with all our kids’. The walk was a wonderful balance of nature, ruggedness and gourmet” Bennett’s family

“Fantastic guides – absolutely made the experience and did a great job with our kids. Kept them involved and interested. We went on the Milford Track in NZ a few years ago and would say this is a better experience – guides, food, accommodation and all the thoughtful planning around the walk were all better. ” Crossley family

“We were so lucky with our trip. Having a bunch of young girls of similar ages to my daughter really made the trip for her.” Hays family

Best time to book a family friendly walk

During the Christmas and New Year break or during other school holiday periods year-round. We offer our 4 day walk between October to April and a 3 day Winter Escape between June to August.

Age

Minimum age is 8 years old on a family friendly walk. Please contact us if your children are younger.

Price

$2,550 per person twin-share all-inclusive.

Inclusions

Includes 3 nights’ accommodation – two nights spent in our beautiful wilderness camps and one night in our beautifully restored heritage listed house. Transfers between Hobart and Maria Island.

All meals and wine (breakfasts, lunches and 3 course dinners). Two guides and park entry fees. Backpacks, 50L Gore-Tex jackets, head torches, sleeping bag liners and pillow cases are provided at the office.

If you’re searching for extraordinary family holiday, please enquire with one of our friendly staff on 03 6234 2999 or bookings@mariaislandwalk.com.au

 

White Kunzea at Haunted Bay

White Kunzea at Haunted Bay on Maria Island

During spring and summer, the Australian native plant Kunzea ambigua (also known as white kunzea, tick bush or sweet scented kunzea) can be found in coastal areas of Tasmania and eastern Australia.

The white kunzea shrub can grow up to 5 m high and it bears small white flowers which fill the air with a sweet honey scent.

Some of the uses of White Kunzea:

  • It can be made into an antiseptic oil for cuts and abrasions
  • The leaves and flowers can be used in cooking. The unique herb can be used on meats/roasts, fried in butter, in bread or added to a cocktail
  • Native animals are often found sleeping under Kunzea plants, where they seek relief from ticks and other parasites – hence it’s popular name of “tick bush”

Enjoy the scent of this beautiful native plant.

More information about the White Kunzea plant:

https://www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/gnp8/kunz-amb.html

 

Tasmanian Devil article in the Telegraph

David Whitley wrote a nice article about Tasmanian Devils:

“The Maria Island Walk – one of the Australian Wildlife Journeys signature experiences – spends four days on the island, staying in glamping cabins and indulging in fully prepared local produce meals. And it’s not just the Tasmanian devils on the wildlife front. Walks along the island’s white-sand beaches bring sightings with playful dolphins and swooping sea eagles, while venturing inland brings birdsong-filled forests, plus encounters with wombats and wallabies.”

read the whole article here